Posts Tagged ‘measure’

Proper counting

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

I just came across an editorial in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (Kirsten M. Madsen, Am Soc Nephrol 10(5):1124-1125, 1999), which states:

A considerable number of manuscripts submitted to the Journal include quantitative morphologic data based on counts and measurements of profiles observed in tissue sections or projected images. Quite often these so-called morphometric analyses are based on assumptions and approximations that cannot be verified and therefore may be incorrect. Moreover, many manuscripts have insufficient descriptions of the sampling procedures and statistical analyses in the Methods section, or it is apparent that inappropriate (biased) sampling techniques were used. Because of the availability today of many new and some old stereologic methods and tools that are not based on undeterminable assumptions about size, shape, or orientation of structures, the Editors of the Journal believe that it is time to dispense with the old, often biased, model-based stereology and change the way we count and measure.

It then goes on to say that the journal would require appropriate stereological methods be employed for quantitative morphologic studies. I have never read a paper in this journal, but certainly hope that they managed to hold on to this standard during the 15 years since this editorial was written. Plenty of journals have not come this far yet.

Computing Feret diameters from the convex hull

Monday, February 13th, 2012

Some time ago I wrote about how to compute the Feret diameters of a 2D object based on the chain code of its boundary. The diameters we computed were the longest and shortest projections of the object. The shortest projection, or smallest Feret diameter, is equivalent to the size measured when physically passing objects through sieves (i.e. sieve analysis, as is often done, e.g., with rocks). The longest projection, or largest Feret diameter, is useful as an estimate of the length of elongated objects.

The algorithm I described then simply rotated the object in two-degree intervals, and computed the projection length at each orientation. The problem with this algorithm is that the width estimated for very elongated objects is not very accurate: the orientation that produces the shortest projection could be up to 1 degree away from the optimal orientation, meaning that the estimated width is length⋅sin(π/180) too large. This doesn’t sound like much, but if the aspect ratio is 100, meaning the length is 100 times the width, we can overestimate the width by up to 175%!

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The convex hull of a 2D object

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

Last year I wrote about computing the the boundary length and various other measures, given an object’s chain code. The chain code is a simple way of encoding the polygon that represents a 2D object. It is very simple to compute the object’s convex hull given this polygon. Why would I want to do that? Well, the convex hull gives several interesting object properties, such as the convexity (object area divided by convex hull area). Certain other properties, such as the Feret diameters, are identical for an object and its convex hull, and the convex hull thus gives an efficient algorithm to compute these properties.

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More chain code measures

Wednesday, October 13th, 2010

Last month I wrote a post showing how to calculate the perimeter of an object using its chain code. In this post I want to review several more measures that can be easily obtained from the chain codes: the minimum bounding box; the object’s orientation, maximum length and minimum width; and the object’s area. The bounding box and area are actually easier computed from the binary image, but if one needs to extract the chain code any way (for example to compute the perimeter) then it’s quite efficient to use the chain code to compute these measures, rather than using the full image. To obtain the chain codes, one can use the algorithm described in the previous post, or the DIPimage function dip_imagechaincode.

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How to obtain the chain code

Monday, September 27th, 2010

In the previous post I discussed simple techniques to estimate the boundary length of a binarized object. These techniques are based on the chain code. This post will detail how to obtain such a chain code. The algorithm is quite simple, but might not be trivial to understand. Future posts will discuss other measures that can be derived from such a chain code.

In short, the chain code is a way to represent a binary object by encoding only its boundary. The chain code is composed of a sequence of numbers between 0 and 7. Each number represents the transition between two consecutive boundary pixels, 0 being a step to the right, 1 a step diagonally right/up, 2 a step up, etc. In the post Measuring boundary length, I gave a little more detail about the chain code. Worth repeating here from that post is the figure containing the directions associated to each code:

Chain codes

The chain code thus has as many elements as there are boundary pixels. Note that the position of the object is lost, the chain code encodes the shape of the object, not its location. But we only need to remember the coordinates of the first pixel in the chain to solve that. Also note, the chain code encodes a single, solid object. If the object has two disjoint parts, or has a hole, the chain code will not be able to describe the full object.

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