Posts Tagged ‘polygon’

Computing Feret diameters from the convex hull

Monday, February 13th, 2012

Some time ago I wrote about how to compute the Feret diameters of a 2D object based on the chain code of its boundary. The diameters we computed were the longest and shortest projections of the object. The shortest projection, or smallest Feret diameter, is equivalent to the size measured when physically passing objects through sieves (i.e. sieve analysis, as is often done, e.g., with rocks). The longest projection, or largest Feret diameter, is useful as an estimate of the length of elongated objects.

The algorithm I described then simply rotated the object in two-degree intervals, and computed the projection length at each orientation. The problem with this algorithm is that the width estimated for very elongated objects is not very accurate: the orientation that produces the shortest projection could be up to 1 degree away from the optimal orientation, meaning that the estimated width is length⋅sin(π/180) too large. This doesn’t sound like much, but if the aspect ratio is 100, meaning the length is 100 times the width, we can overestimate the width by up to 175%!

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The convex hull of a 2D object

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

Last year I wrote about computing the the boundary length and various other measures, given an object’s chain code. The chain code is a simple way of encoding the polygon that represents a 2D object. It is very simple to compute the object’s convex hull given this polygon. Why would I want to do that? Well, the convex hull gives several interesting object properties, such as the convexity (object area divided by convex hull area). Certain other properties, such as the Feret diameters, are identical for an object and its convex hull, and the convex hull thus gives an efficient algorithm to compute these properties.

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